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French CHAB News December 2023

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

NEXT MEETINGS
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Saturday 9 March 2024 at 3 PM

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STEAMBOATS ON THE MISSISSIPPI

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Presentation by Michel Verheyden: Steamboats on the Mississippi. The speaker will tell us about the development of steamboats on the great American river before, during and after the American Civil War. The topic will include aspects of these vessels, their propulsion, life on board, their civilian and military use, and accidents involving steamboats. The speaker will also mention the various battles in which riverboats were involved. Finally, the creation of hospital ships will also be developed.     
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Saturday 13 April 2024 at 3 PM

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MISSOURI IN TURMOIL

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Lecture by Gerald Hawkins: Missouri in turmoil. In 1861, when Kansas joined the Union as a free state, thousands of pro-slavery border ruffians who had been involved in years of violence during the Bloody Kansas conflict, either joined the Confederate army of General Sterling Price in Arkansas or returned to their home state of Missouri. Despite the efforts of its governor Claiborne Jackson, Missouri did not secede and remained a Border State where the population was deeply divided over its loyalty to the Union or the Confederacy. After the battle of Boonville in June, General Nathaniel Lyon managed to clear Missouri of most of its southern sympathizers and the poorly organized outlaw groups, but this sparked a state of rebellion in areas that were poorly controlled by federal forces. Resistance was soon organized. Bands of determined pro-slavery guerrillas emerged, spreading terror among the people of Missouri. The most notorious was led by William Quantrill, who enjoyed the status of regular soldier granted by the Confederate Partisan Act of 1861. The horror reached its climax when in August 1863, Quantrill launched a devastating raid on Lawrence, Kansas, killing some two hundred residents and burning the town. The war then turned into a ruthless hunt for outlaws by the federal forces backed by vengeful militias. Quantrill and many of his lieutenants were killed or captured in 1865. The James and Younger brothers escaped unharmed and, drawing on their experience, became outlaws who targeted banks and trains.
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CHAB NEWS END OF PUBLICATION NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform its foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of the CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.
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LATEST PAINTINGS OF JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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GUNS OF THE NORTH

CHRISTMAS AT MOSS NECK

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The Army of the Potomac’s Fifth Corps was given orders to head south from its Maryland camps into enemy territory in early November of 1862. The men crossed the Potomac River in the middle of the night and rested for a few hours in the village of Harper’s Ferry. Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment were in their element in cold weather. Being born and raised in the State of Maine, the regiment felt strong as temperatures began to drop. Soon heavy snows covered the northern Virginia countryside. On November 5th, President Abraham Lincoln gave the order to relieve General George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac. General Ambrose E. Burnside was then given command of the army. The next day the Fifth Corps continued their march from their bivouac at Snicker’s Gap. In the evening of November the 9th, Chamberlain and his 20th Maine arrived at the Fifth Corps headquarters near Warrenton. They would be in time to witness McClellan’s emotional farewell as he rode by thousands of cheering solders lining the sides of the Alexandria and Warrenton Pike. The Fifth Corps division gave General McClellan the honorable tribute of snapping to attention with the command order, “Present Arms”. General Burnside was now in charge of the Army of the Potomac, and his skills and decisions would be tested against those of General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Fredericksburg.   

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

During the winter of 1862-63 General Stonewall Jackson made his headquarters at one of Virginia’s most lavish estates, Moss Neck Manor. The 1600 acre plantation owned by the Corbin family was eleven miles down river from Fredericksburg. The majestic home was 250 feet long with two wings. Moss Neck Plantation became the winter quarters for the Second Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia. The soldiers camped near the stables several hundred yards from the manor. The last days of 1862 were cold and snowy. Both General Jackson and Lee wrote letters to their wives expressing their hopes and dreams of peace for the coming year. Jackson’s wife Anna wished him to take leave and travel to North Carolina to see his family for the season. Stonewall replied, “It appears to me that it is better for me to remain with the command so long as the war continues, if ever gracious Heavenly Father permits. The Army suffers immensely from absentees. If all our troops, officers & men were at their posts, we might through God’s blessing, expect a more speedy termination of the war.” As Christmas approached the Corbins and Jackson prepared for a big celebration. Grateful southern citizens brought so much food to the manor that Jackson invited General Lee, Stuart, Pendleton, along with selected staff members to a Christmas dinner. A lavish table was prepared with three turkeys, ham, oysters, vegetables, pickles, and freshly baked biscuits. A bottle of wine would be served by servants wearing white aprons. When the twelve officers arrived for dinner, all were surprised at the bounty of the feast. A great time was had by all. On the last day of the year General Lee published to his army a congratulatory order on the successful battle of Fredericksburg. But in it he warned that new duties lay ahead. “The war is not yet ended. The enemy is still numerous and strong, and our country demands of the army a renewal of its heroic efforts in her behalf.” .

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

 

For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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