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"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETINGS    
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Saturday November 10, 2018 at 3 PM

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REPRESENTING THE AMERICAN CIVIL  WAR

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Maurice Jaquemyns: Representing the American Civil War. The surrender of General Lee on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox put an end to the American Civil War. Although the guns were now silent, the conflict is prolonged through historical paintings of the war. This pictorial genre fulfills two purposes. First ideological: the representations of the specifics of war make it possible to exalt the heroism displayed during the conflict and to justify the sacrifices made for victory or admit the reality of glorious defeat. Then commercial, as well for artists as for image distribution companies: the memory of the belligerent calls for a demand and specialized companies such as Kurz and Allison respond to their requests. Our lecturer will place these perspectives in a global approach to the paintings of war in the history of art and various examples will be proposed to feed his hypothesis applied to the American Civil War. The artwork of Don Troiani, John Paul Strain and other artists will be analyzed. The French poet Charles Baudelaire fully understood the role played by historical paintings of war; referring to Ernest Meissonier (1815-1891), an artist of the First Empire, he stated: “Meissonier wages war with paintbrushes.”

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Saturday December 8, 2018, at 3 PM

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THROUGH THE EYE OF THE CAMERA

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Mehdi Schneyders: “Through the eye of the camera.” Photography is a wonderful invention that today seems trivial because it is part of our daily lives. However, thanks to photography, we are able to appreciate and admire the things that are most valuable to us: a moment exposed to light, a human being, a place, an era. The Civil War was without a doubt the first major conflict to be massively immortalized through ambrotypes, daguerreotypes, tintypes and other business cards. From the studio to the battlefield, strangers and personalities, Unionists and Confederates alike, posed to leave a trace of themselves for the sake of transmitting a memory, out of pride or for propaganda. The aim of this lecture is to highlight different topics, revealing the details they contain and the little story behind each shot. From 1861 to 1865, we will travel through the sharp eye of the photographer in order to admire, as a passionate or uninitiated, the visual testimonies engraved for eternity.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued March 29, 2018)
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The great escape from Libby prison, by Lt Frank E. Moran, U.S.V.

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued September 28, 2018)
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The Sons of Liberty, traitors or patriots?, by Dominique De Cleer

The Chattanooga campaign - Grant opens the gateway to the Deep South, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform our foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of our CHAB News can unfortunately no longer be published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to those who are contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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FIRE IN THE VALLEY

COURTING MISS NELLIE

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The 43rd Virginia Cavalry Battalion, better known as Mosby's Rangers, was one of the most feared and renowned combat units operating in northern Virginia and the Lower Shenandoah Valley. These rangers were an elite force of scouts and guerrilla fighters who were commanded by John Singleton Mosby. The adventures and exploits of Mosby's Rangers became legendary in American military history. In early August 1864, the Federal Army came under the command of a new leader, Major General Phillip H. Sheridan. Sheridan began to push his army southward down the valley and established his headquarters south of Winchester. Supplies for the Federal Army came from Harper's Ferry by wagon train. On August the 12th, Mosby gathered his men at Rectortown, intent on interrupting Sheridan's supply line. Mosby's force consisted of nearly 350 Rangers, bolstered by two cannons. Sheridan's 525-wagon train, supported by 3 regiments and a small cavalry force left Harper's Ferry loaded with supplies on the morning of the 12th. After traveling all day, the wagon train camped near Berryville at Buck Marsh Creek. Early the next morning as the fog lifted, Federal soldiers preparing for the day's travel were suddenly panicked by three rounds of cannon fire, followed by the rebel yell of charging Southern cavalry. Pandemonium ensued, and the Federals fled for life and limb, leaving the supply train. After burning many of the wagons, Mosby and his men captured 200 prisoners, 500 mules, 50 horses, 200 cattle, along with what spoils they could carry from the wagons. Left behind however, was a cash box of the 8th New York Cavalry containing $112,000. As the Rangers rode away in high spirits, a number were trying to play melodies on some captured fiddles, to the complaints of their friends. Later that evening the prizes from the raid were divided among the men, with the prisoners and most of the cattle sent off to the Army of Northern Virginia..

Nellie Ellen Koontz was born in Edinburg, Virginia on January 13, 1845. She was a beautiful, precocious, and strong willed child, being raised by her parents William J. Koontz and Elizabeth Ann Grandstaff. Nellie’s mother was the daughter of Major George Grandstaff, an old US Army veteran of the Mexican War and owner of the Edinburg Mill. As the American Civil War raged throughout much of the country in 1862, Nellie was a 17 year old teenager going to school, working on the farm, and helping her grandfather at the mill. Little did she know she would become a heroine in the Shenandoah, when the “Yanks” came calling 1864. Women did what they could to help in the war effort. As men left to join the army, the responsibilities of raising children and running the farm became theirs. Many served as nurses, helping wounded soldiers, often times in their own homes. Woman applied their skills at making clothing, blankets, quilts and even socks, for the army. But despite the war, life went on. Friendships were made. Eligible young girls would attend parties and dances to meet young men. They would write letters to their sweethearts who were away serving in the army, hoping for their safe return. In the autumn of 1864 the war would arrive in the little town of Edinburg. Union General Philip Sheridan sent his soldiers to burn down the Grandstaff Mill and anything of value to the Confederate Army. Nellie and her cousin Melvina galloped to Sheridan’s headquarters to plead with him for mercy, as their grandfather was a US war veteran. Sheridan rescinded his orders for the destruction of the mill, and the two girls galloped back to Edinburg saving the mill in the nick of time. After the war was over, Nellie married Newton French McCann and the couple would have three children. After a long and happy life, Nellie passed away in Edinburg on September 19, 1927. To this day the legend of her exploits during the Civil War lives on in the Shenandoah Valley.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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