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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM PM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday March 11, 2017, at 3 PM

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IUKA AND CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI - AUTUMN 1862

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At our temporary meeting place, lecture by Jean-Claude Janssens: “Iuka and Corinth, Mississippi - Fall of 1862 - A useless and bloody campaign”. At the end of the summer of 1862, General Braxton Bragg moved the majority of his Confederate Army of Mississippi from Tupelo, Mississippi, to Chattanooga in Tennessee. He prepared to invade Kentucky, leaving behind part of his forces. The Confederates stationed south of Corinth were commanded by two generals, both as colorful as mediocre: the amateur Sterling Price and the professional Earl Van Dorn. On September 19, Price was defeated at Iuka by General William Rosecrans and on the 28, he joined his superior Van Dorn at Ripley. On October 3 and 4, they both attacked Corinth. The determined Rosecrans awaited them firmly and inflicted a resounding defeat on the Southerners. The next day, the rebels nearly saw their retreat cut off at Hatchie Bridge. What remained of their forces barely managed to reach Holly Springs. In December 1862, Van Dorn’s army was dissolved. Jean-Claude will review the personality of the three main antagonists and attempt to depict this deplorable campaign with the support of period maps and photographs.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued March 31, 2016)
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Fort Donelson - Just who is running the show? by Paul Kensey

The Bristoe campaign, the last strategic offensive of General Lee, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued September 29, 2016)
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Forty days of hell, the Atlanta campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

Eastern North Carolinians in the Union army, by Donald E. Collins

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NEXT CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end March 2017)
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The return of the Tuscarora, by Donald E. Collins

Debacle in Tennessee, the Franklin and Nashville campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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FORTHCOMING CHAB NEWS
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The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

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It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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THE VIRGINIA REEL

JACKSON MEETS LITTLE SORREL

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It was Christmas Eve of 1862. Rich golden sounds from a great tent echoed throughout the snowy covered hills of General J.E.B. Stuart's cavalry camp. Banjo player Sam Sweeney and his musicians were entertaining General Stuart and his staff members along with Stuart's wife Flora, other wives, and sweethearts. It was a night to remember with merriment, dancing, delicacies to eat such as chicken, turkey, hams, sweet potatoes, butter, 30 dozen eggs, apple brandy (saved for the occasion), whiskey, and a great bowl of egg nog. Dancing the Virginia Reel was a highlight of the celebration. However, General Robert E. Lee had given orders for a major raid by General Stuart's cavalry for Christmas Day. As the band played on, only General Stuart and a select number of officers knew they would be in the saddle before daybreak on another dangerous expedition. Not a word was said at the party about the impending raid. Stuart was happy and cheerful as he enjoyed his moments with Flora. As dawn approached on Christmas Day the bugler sounded the call for boots and saddles. Astounded to hear the orders, troopers had an hour to saddle, draw rations and pack ammunition. As the sun rose above the horizon 1800 horsemen were on the move and crossed Kelly's Ford. But thoughts of the season were still with the men, for it had been a night to remember.

In the spring of 1861, Col. Thomas J. Jackson was sent to the Confederacy's northern most point, the town of Harpers Ferry, to take command of the troops there and secure the armory and arsenal. Jackson's job was to organize and instruct the eager men ready to defend Virginia. Jackson's appearance was at first a little disappointing to the soldiers who did not know him. He was described as wearing his faded Virginia Military Institute uniform, with a blue cap pulled down concealing his features. A day or two after Jackson's arrival, an eastbound livestock train was seized, and a number of horses were recruited to the Confederacy. The horses were taken to the river for water, near the picturesque landmark where the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers meet. Jackson, being without a good mount, picked out two of the horses with the help of Major John Harmon. One of the horses was a powerful, large sorrel, and the other gelding was small and well rounded. Within a day Jackson found the larger animal skittish with a jarring gait, while the smaller sorrel had a smooth and easy gait with an even temperament. And so began a relationship between horse and rider, which would become one of the most recognizable partnerships of the war. They would soon be known as General Stonewall Jackson and his horse Little Sorrel.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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