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French CHAB News December 2021

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETINGS
 

Saturday 11 June 2022 at 6 PM  

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ANNUAL CHAB SUPPER

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As in previous editions, the annual CHAB supper will take place at the club house of the Hoegaarden hockey club. Hubert Leroy and Dominique De Cleer have elaborated an original American menu. Aperitif of the house – Soup: New England clam chowder – Main course: Périgord-style burger and vegetable garnish – Dessert: frozen nougat with red fruit topping – Coffee/Tea. Price of the meal (drinks not included) - CHAB members: € 35 - nonmembers: € 45. Please register with our secretary Dominique De Cleer by e-mail at d.decleer@scarlet.be and pay the amount of your meal to the CHAB bank account BE90 3100 9059 2632 with the reference CHAB supperbefore 6 June 2022 at the latest.

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Saturday 10 September 2022 at 3 PM

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THE CONFEDERATE STATES MARINES

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At our temporary premises at Wolubilis, lecture by Daniel Frankignoul: The Confederate States Marines – a corps forgotten in history. The Confederate Marine Corps provided security detachments for warships and merchant raiders, and guarded shipyards. Also used as a landing force, the maintenance of the main artillery pieces on the ships and within the coastal batteries was entrusted to this unit. The theoretical strength of the corps, commanded by a regular colonel, was forty-six officers and nine hundred and forty-four men for the whole South, but it never exceeded six hundred men in the field. The archives kept by its sole commander, Colonel Lloyd J. Beall, were destroyed in the fire that gutted his house in 1887. No regulations concerning their uniforms have been found, so one has to rely solely on a few objects, documents, surviving newspapers or vintage photographs. In addition, bibliography on the subject is almost non-existent so recounting, even briefly, the history of this elite corps is a real challenge.

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Saturday 8 October 2020 at 3 PM

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STATUARY AND THE CIVIL WAR

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Maurice Jaquemyns: Statuary and the Civil War. Civil War commemorative statuary responds to codes of expression that run through the entire history of art. We will discuss the artistic manifestations of this type of representation used by the belligerents in the conflict and we will focus our attention on their underlying intentions. We will end the conference with a general synthesis of our previous interventions by highlighting the roles and codes of military representation whatever the medium: paintings of land and naval battles, comics and commemorative statuary.

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Saaturday 5 November 2022 at 7 PM

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CHAB'S 50th ANNIVERSARY GRAND BANQUET

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Our association is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year (1972-2022). To celebrate this memorable event, the CHAB is organizing a grand banquet in a stylish restaurant, details to be communicated in due course. A private room will be reserved for for the evening.

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Saturday 10 December 2022 at 3 PM

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TEXAS, AN INDEPENDENT AMERICAN REPUBLIC 

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Jean-Claude Janssens: Texas, an independent American Republic (1836-1845). As of 1520, Texas as we know it today was part of the Spanish Empire. Between 1685 and 1690, it was French before returning to the Crown of Spain; nevertheless, it was claimed again by France until 1763. In 1821, Mexico – of which Texas was an integral part – proclaimed its independence from Spain. From that moment on, the history of this barren land would accelerate, and at the request of the government of Mexico, American immigrants settled there. In 1835, the new Texans numbered thirty thousand for only eight thousand natives. In 1836, Texas Americans broke away from Mexico. After almost ten years of precarious independence, they joined their powerful neighbor, the United States of America.

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CHAB NEWS NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform its foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of the CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.
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LATEST PAINTINGS OF JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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THE OLD GRAY FOX

SIC SEMPER TYRANNIS

 

For the first three months of 1864 General Lee and his staff routinely rode 20 miles through the mountains and foothills of Orange County Virginia inspecting the winter quarters of his army.  Lee’s staff members included Major Walter Taylor, Major Charles S. Venable, and Major Charles Marshall.  Occasionally accompanying Lee was his old friend and secretary, Armistead Lindsay Long, who was now a Brigadier General placed in command of the artillery in General Ewell’s Second Corps. General Lee had an abundance of work to do during these winter months.  Preceding battles had lost him many of his best commanding officers, such as Generals Jackson, Pender, Armistead and Pettigrew.  Many other officers had been taken out of action with crippling wounds. The slow process of promotion bothered experienced officers ready to take on higher rank.  It was General Lee’s job to re-organize and prepare his army for the critical and decisive campaign that was to come.  Affectionally know by his troops as “The Old Gray Fox”, General Lee had big plans for his army when the season changed, believing like his men, the war could still be won.

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

In 1775, the Revolutionary War began in earnest as American patriots fought the British army for their independence. The founders of the Constitution met at the second Continental Congress in Philadelphia, and George Washington was named Commander in Chief of the Continental Army. By June of 1776, the Virginia legislature had adopted Virginia’s Declaration of Rights and the First Virginia Constitution. A seal for the Commonwealth of Virginia was needed, and delegate George Mason recommended the phrase “Sic Semper Tyrannis” (Thus Always to Tyrants), be included. The seal artwork was designed by George Wythe and featured the Goddess of Virtue holding a sword and spear, resting her foot on the tyrant King George. Wythe was a distinguished Virginia judge, a signatory of the Declaration of Independence, and a Founding Father of the United States. Wythe was also a law professor and mentored Thomas Jefferson, Henry Clay and John Marshall. In May of 1861, the Virginia legislature voted to secede from the Federal government and join the Confederate States of America. The convention of delegates also approved an ordinance to establish a flag for the commonwealth, adopting the pattern of the Virginia state seal of 1776 surrounded by a blue field. Virginia brigades would carry these hand painted flags featuring the Goddess of Virtue and motto “Sic Semper Tyrannis” into battle against invading federal forces. Confederate officers often purchased their own swords after obtaining a commission in the army. These swords varied in quality as well as intricacy in design, depending on the officer’s rank and wealth. It was fairly common for Generals of the highest rank to carry an ornate sword, possibly with brass fittings, silver plated handle, and their name engraved on the scabbard. Sometimes, these elegant swords were donated to the generals by a grateful citizen. General Robert E. Lee of Virginia carried a Colt 1851 Navy revolver, 3rd model - 36 cal. 6-shot round cylinder, with a 7 1/2” octagonal barrel. The piece featured a brass front bead, one piece walnut handle, silver plated brass trigger guard, and backstrap. The revolver was engraved by the W.L. Armsby Company, New York, and had the serial number 37698. After the war, Lee kept the revolver in a holster hanging from the headboard in his bedroom. General Lee would pass away on October 12, 1870. His revolver was then emptied with all six shots firing. The motto, “Sic Semper Tyrannis”, still adorns the Virginia State flag to this day. Robert E. Lee’s revolver can be seen in the American Museum of the Civil War, in Richmond, Virginia.

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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