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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday June 9, 2018, at 6 PM

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ANNUAL CHAB BARBECUE

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The annual CHAB barbecue will take place at the club house of the hockey club in Hoegaarden. See road map

Our chefs Dominique De Cleer and Hubert Leroy will take place behind the grill. The menu will consist of a starter (salmon pate) followed by grilled meats (beef skewers, spare ribs and sausages), salads and baked potatoes, and a dessert (chocolate mousse) plus coffee/tea. Welcome cocktail on the house. Price of the meal (drinks not included) - CHAB members: 35 € - non members: 45 €. Please make reservations with our secretary Dominique De Cleer, either by tel. at 0475-773460 or preferably by e-mail to d.decleer@scarlet.be, and pay the price of your meal to the CHAB bank account BE90 3100 9059 2632 with the mention BBQ CHAB, before June 6, 2018 at the latest.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued September 21, 2017)
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The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Alcide Bouanchaud, Pointe Coupee Artillery, Louisiana, by Brian Costello

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued March 29, 2018)
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The great escape from Libby prison, by Lt Frank E. Moran, U.S.V.

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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NEXT CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end September 2018)
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The Chattanooga campaign - Grant forces the door of the Deep South, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

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It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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TO THE LOST FORD

PEACE IN THE VALLEY

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In the spring of 1863 Colonel Abel D. Streight of Indiana submitted a plan to General Rosecrans to transport 2000 soldiers by river boat from Nashville, to Eastport, Mississippi, and on from there to destroy the railroads in the interior of Alabama and Georgia. General Bragg, receiving news of the invading force, ordered General Nathan Bedford Forrest to stop the enemy's advance. Bragg had unleashed the most dangerous quick-striking force of the Confederate Army. On April 30th, General Forrest attacked the rear of the Federal column, completely surprising the startled soldiers in blue. Streight's men engaged a number of Forrest's regiments on horseback. Many horses and men were killed in the charge. Before Forrest could regroup his men and form them into a dismounted line of battle, Col. Streight's forces had remounted their mules and were on the run. So began a running gun battle that would go on for 4 days, 4 nights and cover 199 miles. After two days and nights of fighting and fleeing, Col. Streight Crossed Black Creek Bridge heading for the safety of Rome. They burned the bridge and, believing Black Creek to be now impassible, Col. Streight eased his pace of retreat. His soldiers were worn down from fear, lack of sleep, and constant fighting, but at last they could feel safe. As General Forrest led his troopers in pursuit, they stopped at the home of Emma Sansom, a 16year-old southern girl whose brother had left home in 1861 to join the 19th Alabama Infantry. Emma told Forrest that the Yankees had burned the bridge down, but if a soldier could saddle her horse, she could show General Forrest a lost ford where his men could cross the creek. Emma would later write that General Forrest said, "There is not time to saddle a horse; get up here behind me." As they started off Emma's mother came running up, out of breath, wishing to know what was happening. Forrest said, "She is going to show me a ford where I can get my men over in time to catch those Yankees before they get to Rome. Don't be uneasy; I will bring her back safe." Emma led Forrest along a branch of the creek that emptied just above the lost ford and pointed out the crossing. He returned the young girl home, and asked for a lock of her hair, before riding back to the lost ford. To Col. Streight's amazement and despair Forrest was back on his trail. Both forces again made an all-night march. At about 9:00 AM on May 3rd, Streight reached the town of Lawrence. Streight deployed his men in defensive positions as Forrest attacked with his much smaller force. As the fighting subsided Forrest sent a flag of truce to the Federal commander, while at the same time, making his force appear larger than it was. Forrest and Streight met face to face. Forrest demanded the surrender of the Federals. When Streight asked Forrest how many men he had, Forrest bluffed saying he had a fresh column of troops arriving and enough men at hand to finish the job. Col. Streight and his command surrendered, and stacked their arms in a clearing as Forrest and his smaller force took them prisoner. The story would be told over many a campfire of how the beautiful southern girl would help the “Wizard of the Saddle” ride down, defeat, and capture the northern invaders.

Peace in the Shenandoah Valley had returned during the early winter months of 1862. The great Stonewall Jackson and his troops had driven out the armies from the North with skill and boldness. General Jackson now commanded the new II Corps with 33,000 troops, beginning the immense task of organizing and preparing his men for the many challenges to come. There was an air of festivity in the town of Winchester as the holiday season was approaching and winter snows had blanketed the valley. Jackson’s wife, Anna had arrived to be with her husband and took up residence with the Reverend Graham family on Braddock Street just a short walk from the general’s headquarters. As Anna and the Graham children prepared for Christmas, General Jackson prepared his troops for what the New Year would bring. But for now, as Stonewall rode past the Opequon Church he was content. He had won peace for his beloved Valley

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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