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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday September 8, 2018, at 3 PM

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NATHAN BEDFORD FORREST

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At our temporary Club House, lecture by Jean-Claude Janssens: “Nathan Bedford Forrest, a general like no other”. Nathan B. Forrest was not only a remarkable Confederate cavalry general. Praised much less than his colleague JEB Stuart, his results in the field were significantly superior. It is not proven that he ever uttered the famous sentence: “Git thar fustest with the mostest”. What is certain is that he often applied that adage. On the other hand, many sources report his connections with the Ku Klux Klan. Legend or reality? There was a Forrest before, during and after the war, three fundamentally different men. Jean-Claude will present the singular facets of this fascinating character with period documents and photographs.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued September 21, 2017)
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The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Alcide Bouanchaud, Pointe Coupee Artillery, Louisiana, by Brian Costello

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued March 29, 2018)
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The great escape from Libby prison, by Lt Frank E. Moran, U.S.V.

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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NEXT CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end September 2018)
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Rodman's great guns, by Donald B. Webster Jr.

Mathew Fontaine Maury, Pathfinder of the Seas, by Keith Gibson

The Chattanooga campaign - Grant opens the gateway to the Deep South, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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FUTURE CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end March 2019)
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The Sons of Liberty, traitors or patriots?, by Dominique De Cleer

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PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

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It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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GOOSE CREEK BRIDGE

PEACE IN THE VALLEY

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General Robert E. Lee began what would be known as the Gettysburg campaign in the early days of June 1863. He carefully marched the Army of Northern Virginia across the Blue Ridge Mountains and into the Shenandoah Valley. Detection by the enemy was one of General Lee’s main concerns. He gave his Cavalry Commander, Major General JEB Stuart, the assignment of screening the army’s movements by operating on the eastern side of the Blue Ridge Mountains. General Stuart would need to keep Federal Cavalry from discovering the Army of Northern Virginia heading north into Maryland and on into Pennsylvania. At the same time, US Major General Joseph Hooker gave orders to his Cavalry Commander Brigadier General Alfred Pleasonton. “The commanding general relies upon you…to give him information of where the enemy is, his force, and his movements…It is better that we should lose men than to be without knowledge of the enemy, as we now seem to be.” The opposing cavalry forces found each other on June 17th, and the running battles from Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville lasted through the 21st. Cavalry charges and counter charges were frequent. Engagements were fast and ferocious. General Stuart directed most of the fighting, employing lightning tactical charges and then giving ground to delay the larger federal force’s advance. This bought valuable time needed for General Lee’s army to march without being discovered. On June 21st, the Goose Creek bridge, located between the towns of Middleburg and Upperville on the Ashby Gap Turnpike, became a choke point that was a focus of the opposing forces. The four-arched stone bridge spanning the waterway was a perfect location for General Stuart to slow the federal advance. Facing 7000 Cavalry and infantry troops, Stuart, with the help of General Wade Hampton, strategically placed cannon on the west side of the bridge holding off the Federals for two hours until they in turn brought up their own cannon. A devastating artillery duel ensued until the Confederates retired to the next high ground to the west. General Stuart’s stand at the bridge gave him time to consolidate his force east of Upperville, where he again delayed the Federal advance. General Stuart’s skill succeeded in preventing General Pleasonton’s men from discovering the Army of Northern Virginia’s invasion north across the Potomac River. The battle of Gettysburg would begin just 10 days after the clash at Goose Creek. General Stuart’s next challenge would be to somehow get around the Federal forces and join General Lee somewhere to the north.

Peace in the Shenandoah Valley had returned during the early winter months of 1862. The great Stonewall Jackson and his troops had driven out the armies from the North with skill and boldness. General Jackson now commanded the new II Corps with 33,000 troops, beginning the immense task of organizing and preparing his men for the many challenges to come. There was an air of festivity in the town of Winchester as the holiday season was approaching and winter snows had blanketed the valley. Jackson’s wife, Anna had arrived to be with her husband and took up residence with the Reverend Graham family on Braddock Street just a short walk from the general’s headquarters. As Anna and the Graham children prepared for Christmas, General Jackson prepared his troops for what the New Year would bring. But for now, as Stonewall rode past the Opequon Church he was content. He had won peace for his beloved Valley

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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