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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday May 11, 2019, at 9 AM

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VISIT OF THE RED STAR LINE MUSEUM

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The end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century saw millions of refugees fleeing the precariousness of their living conditions in the hope of a better life in America. Between 1873 and 1935, more than 2,000,000 passengers - including a quarter of Jews fleeing Russian and Austro-Hungarian pogroms - would board the Red Star Line’s ships bound for New York or Philadelphia. The stock market crash of 1929 and the tightening of immigration policy definitively put an end to the activities of the shipping company. Since 2001, the government of the Flemish Community has recognized the historic value of the old buildings of the Red Star Line that were bought by the city in 2005. That same year, a New York architect bureau was awarded the restoration project of these hangars. Two years later, a scientific committee was set up and on September 28, 2013, the Red Star Line museum opened its doors at the Rhine wharf where were once moored the ships bound for the United States of America.

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Programme

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9.00 AM: meeting at our temporary club house at Wolubilis - Coffee.

9.30 AM:  lecture by Dominique De Cleer: From Antwerp to New York: the story of the Red Star Line.

10.30 AM: departure by car to Antwerp.

11.30 AM: guided tour of the Red Star Line museum. Entrance fee: € 6.00.

1.30 PM:  lunch in an Antwerp restaurant. Estimated price: +/- € 35.00.

4.00 PM: end of the formal outing. Possibility of visiting the town.

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Please make reservations with our secretary Dominique De Cleer, either by tel. at 0475-773460 or preferably by e-mail to d.decleer@scarlet.be before May 6, 2019. Depending on the schedule at the museum, the visit and lunch may be switched.

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Saturday June 8, 2019, at 6 PM

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ANNUAL CHAB SUPPER

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As in previous editions, the annual CHAB supper will take place at the club house of the Hoegaarden Hockey Club. This year, Hubert Leroy and Dominique De Cleer propose an original menu from Cajun country. Aperitif: Planter’s punch - Starter: shrimp and crab Gumbo - Main course: skewers La Coche, chicken wings, Avery Island sauce, vegetables and corn fritters - Dessert: pecan pie - Coffee/Tea. Price of the meal (drinks not included) - CHAB members: 35 € - non members: 45 €. Please make reservations with our secretary Dominique De Cleer, either by tel. at 0475-773460 or preferably by e-mail to d.decleer@scarlet.be, and pay your meal on the CHAB account BE90 3100 9059 2632 with the reference “CHAB supper” before June 2, 2019 at the latest.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued March 29, 2018)
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The great escape from Libby prison, by Lt Frank E. Moran, U.S.V.

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued September 28, 2018)
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The Sons of Liberty, traitors or patriots?, by Dominique De Cleer

The Chattanooga campaign - Grant opens the gateway to the Deep South, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform our foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of our CHAB News can unfortunately no longer be published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to those who are contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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STARLIGHT RAID

BERKELEY SPRINGS EXPEDITION

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A blanket of snow covered the Virginia countryside in the early days of January when Major John S. Mosby, commanding the 43rd Battalion of Partisan Rangers, received an intriguing communique. The message was from Captain Frank Stringfellow, a well known trusted scout of J.E.B. Stuart and Robert E. Lee. Stringfellow had a reputation for providing accurate intelligence on enemy activity. Stringfellow’s plan was to attack and capture a Maryland Cavalry Battalion performing picket duty near the Hillsboro road at Loudoun Heights, a strategic passage leading to Harper’s Ferry. Stringfellow believed the enemy camp of 200 men could be easily surprised at night and captured while sleeping without firing a single shot. Mosby considered the plan and knew attacking a much larger force would have to be performed with precision and stealth in order to be successful. He gathered his men on January 9th at Upperville, and the hard march to capture US Major Henry Cole’s Maryland Cavalry began. Major Mosby’s brother William later wrote about the night raid. “The snow covered the ground, an icy wind swept down through the passes of the neighboring Blue Ridge, and altogether the night was the coldest that ever broke away from the North Pole and wandered south of the Arctic circle - a splendid night for a surprise party.” The Confederate column marched along the base of the Short Hills until it reached the Potomac River. The Rangers quietly moved up the river bank towards Harper’s Ferry. As they began their ascent up the mountain they could see Federal encampment fires across the river on the Maryland side. The steep icy snow-covered wooded cliffs could only be climbed by men leading their horses single file. At about 5am Mosby’s force of 100 men were finally in position to make their move to surprise the sleeping enemy. Mosby dismounted a portion of his force and they quietly captured the first row of Cole’s men sleeping in their tents. Suddenly a shot rang out from somewhere, (Mosby believed it was from Stringfellow’s men yelling and shooting). The element of surprise was gone and all hell and confusion broke loose. The Federals came pouring barefoot out of their tents armed with pistols and carbines. A number of Mosby’s faithful men were killed or wounded, and a hasty retreat towards Hillsboro was made carrying as many of their wounded as possible. The Rangers lost five men and six were wounded. Victory had been in their grasp but as so often happens in war, unforeseen events can change the course of history. .

General Stonewall Jackson had a number of goals he wanted to accomplish during his January 1st 1862 expedition to several towns under the occupation of Federal troops in western Virginia. Jackson’s main priority was the defense of the Shenandoah Valley. As such he would need to clear out the Federal garrison in the town of Berkeley Springs, also known as Bath, from troops under the command of US Brigadier General Frederick W. Lander. With his northern flank secured he would then turn his attention to the Federal garrison of 5000 men located in Romney under the command of Brigadier General Benjamin F. Kelley. After taking Romney, General Jackson planned to attack the Federal garrison and railroad hub of Cumberland Maryland. Also on the agenda was to sever or disrupt the lines of supply and transport of the enemy by destroying as much of the B&O Railroad as possible. The expedition would also test Jackson’s newly formed army. He would learn which officers under his command he could trust and count on, and those he could not. His troops would also be tried under difficult circumstances during winter conditions, against multiple foes. In short Jackson would learn “who was worth his salt”. On the comfortable sunny day of January 1st Confederate troops marched from Winchester towards Berkeley Springs. Jackson’s cavalry under the command of Lt. Colonel Turner Ashby led the way, followed by four brigades of infantry. The travel was easy at first moving over flat terrain, but in the late afternoon a cold front blew through, dropping temperatures that night into the teens. The column halted at Pughtown for the night after covering 8 miles. The next day the army was on the move again pushing against a blinding heavy snow storm. Miraculously the army was able to cover another 7 miles and camped at Unger’s Store. By the middle of the afternoon the next day Jackson’s force had marched another eleven miles in the snow and elements of Ashly’s Cavalry had engaged the enemy 3 miles outside of Berkeley Springs. That night as the army camped in the woods near the enemy garrison of 1400 troops, another half a foot of snow fell during the night. The morning of January 4th the Stonewall Brigade again dug out of the snow. As the troops crawled out from under their snow-laden blankets, half-frozen, they were cursing General Jackson as the cause of their sufferings. Unbeknown to them, the General lay close by under a tree, also snowed under, and heard all their complaints. Without a chastisement he too crawled out from under a snow covered blanket. Shaking the snow off, he made some humorous remark to the nearest men, who had no idea he had arrived during the night and lain down amongst them. News of what had happened spread throughout the ranks in short order, and fully reestablished his popularity. It was fortunate at that time for the troops to learn the metal of their leader as they were soon to go into battle. The attack at Berkeley Springs was not as coordinated as Jackson had planned. General Loring, one of Jackson’s commanders “managed to scatter the rest of his command all over the countryside - except toward the front”. Exasperated, General Jackson rode into the confusion and took charge. By mid-afternoon Jackson dashed into the city with his escort, ahead of his own skirmishers. The enemy had high-tailed it out, retreating to the town of Hancock. Stonewall had learned much about his command that day, and he and his Stonewall Brigade established headquarters in Strother’s health resort in Berkeley Springs. Phase one of his expedition was difficult, but a success. His next test was the garrison at Romney.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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