CHAB a.s.b.l.
 

Home
 
About Us
 
Officers
 
Activities
 
Programme
 
Articles
 
Publications
 
Library
 
International
 
Contributors
 
Information
 

This site requires


 

 

 

 
 

MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

.

HOME

CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM PM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

6

.
NEXT MEETING    
.

Saturday April 8, 2017, at 3 PM

.

PROJECTION OF THE FILM 'FREE STATE OF JONES'

.

.

At our temporary meeting place at Wolubilis, projection on a large screen of the English version of the movie Free State of Jones. In the midst of the Civil War, Newton Knight, a Mississippi farmer, is disgusted by the absurdity of war and deserts the Southern army. Back home, he leads a group of poor white peasants and fugitive slaves in their fight against the Confederates. After forming a regiment of resolute rebels, Knight engages in a successful guerrilla warfare, which ends up with Jones County, Mississippi, separating from the Confederacy to become The Free State of Jones. If the end of the war and the emancipation of slaves give rise to rejoicing, Knight and his men quickly become disillusioned. Hope gives way to racism and abuses replace the right to vote. An emblematic and controversial figure, Knight continued his struggle during the Reconstruction period, challenging the civil authority well after the end of the conflict. Film running time: 139 minutes.

.

.
PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued March 31, 2016)
.

Fort Donelson - Just who is running the show? by Paul Kensey

The Bristoe campaign, the last strategic offensive of General Lee, by Jean-Claude Janssens

.

5
CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued September 29, 2016)
.

Forty days of hell, the Atlanta campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

Eastern North Carolinians in the Union army, by Donald E. Collins

.

.
NEXT CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end March 2017)
.

The return of the Tuscarora, by Donald E. Collins

Debacle in Tennessee, the Franklin and Nashville campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

.

.
FORTHCOMING CHAB NEWS
.

The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

.

.

PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

.

It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

.

.

LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

.

4

JACKSON MEETS LITTLE SORREL

HAMPTON ROADS

6

In the spring of 1861, Col. Thomas J. Jackson was sent to the Confederacy's northern most point, the town of Harpers Ferry, to take command of the troops there and secure the armory and arsenal. Jackson's job was to organize and instruct the eager men ready to defend Virginia. Jackson's appearance was at first a little disappointing to the soldiers who did not know him. He was described as wearing his faded Virginia Military Institute uniform, with a blue cap pulled down concealing his features. A day or two after Jackson's arrival, an eastbound livestock train was seized, and a number of horses were recruited to the Confederacy. The horses were taken to the river for water, near the picturesque landmark where the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers meet. Jackson, being without a good mount, picked out two of the horses with the help of Major John Harmon. One of the horses was a powerful, large sorrel, and the other gelding was small and well rounded. Within a day Jackson found the larger animal skittish with a jarring gait, while the smaller sorrel had a smooth and easy gait with an even temperament. And so began a relationship between horse and rider, which would become one of the most recognizable partnerships of the war. They would soon be known as General Stonewall Jackson and his horse Little Sorrel.

She was named the Belle of the Sea. Her bow was adorned by a beautiful maiden cradling a yellow rose. The clipper ship was long and sleek, beautiful as her name sake. She was built for speed, and often capable of reaching 20 knots, in contrast to the 5-6 knots attained by other ships of the day. At full sail her bow would neatly cleave water into mirror image waves. The ship in its full glory was over 200 feet in length at 1255 tons, sporting a wooden hull. Fast and sleek, silent and dark at night, she was a 19th century “Flying Dutchman”. The ship was built in the New England coastal town of Marblehead, Massachusetts by Ewell & Dutton in 1857. First owned by T.B. Waters & Co. of Boston, the merchant ship traveled to many ports across the seas covering thousands of miles. The ship was eventually sold in Liverpool, England in 1864 for $45,000. Sailors had three requirements for a clipper ship. “She must be sharp-lined, built for speed. She must be tall-sparred and carry the utmost spread of canvas. And she must use that sail, day and night, fair weather and foul.” The Belle of the Sea was all of these. Sailing through Hampton Roads on the James River, the Belle of the Sea had now returned to one of the more important ports in Virginia, Norfolk. The crew would off load and load their cargo for the next leg of the journey. It would be the last time for the ship to dock there as war would soon come to Virginia, and President Lincoln would impose a blockade of all Southern ports. This action would lead to one of the greatest naval battles in history, the Battle of Hampton Roads. On March 8, 1862 the ironclad CSS Virginia would attack three Federal wooden hulled ships blockading Hampton Roads. Two of these were sunk, with the third run aground. The next day an epic battle would be fought between two ironclads, the USS Monitor and the CSS Virginia (Merrimack), and the United States Navy would carry the day.

.

For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

.