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French CHAB News of December 2019

 

 
 

MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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HOME

CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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SUSPENSION OF ACTIVITIES

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The propagation of the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic will not ease in the near future as tens of thousands of people may be unwittingly infected. Therefore, a return to normality is certainly not contemplated in the short term. For these reasons, the CHAB committee has decided to suspend all its activities until further notice. The April 18 meeting, the May 9 outing to Dinant and the June 13 annual supper in Hoegaarden will therefore not take place. The resumption of activities will be communicated on this site as soon as possible.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform its foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of our CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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HOME ON BRADDOCK STREET

JESSE JAMES

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General Stonewall Jackson was in high spirits during the snowy days of January 1862. He and his army had returned from successful expeditions to Bath and Romney. He learned that his men were strong and faithful through difficult and challenging days. The Federals in Northern Virginia had been shown that his army was not to be taken lightly. Also to Stonewall’s delight, his wife Anna was in Winchester staying at the home of Reverend James R. Graham located on Braddock Street. For the first time General Jackson and Anna could be together for an extended period of time. The General’s headquarters and office were just up the street at the home of Lieutenant Colonel Lewis T. Moore, commander of the 31st Virginia Militia. The Graham family home was the perfect place for the Jacksons to stay in Winchester. Fanny and James Graham were wonderful hosts and the General loved their three children, Anne, Alfred and William. The Jacksons were given the upstairs northeast corner of the house for their privacy. The family atmosphere at the Graham home was just the respite that the General needed from the stress and responsibilities of the military. The General would never conduct or discuss any military matters or business at the Graham home. If a courier or dispatch arrived, Jackson would direct the man to his office up the street. General Jackson was a man of meticulous habits. He would arise at the same early hour every day and immediately go to his headquarters to attend to the mail and issue orders for the day. A few minutes before 8:00am he would return to the Graham’s home and escort his wife downstairs to breakfast. Speaking of General Jackson, Reverend Graham would tell his parishioners that “he is really a member of my family. He ate every day at my table, slept every night under my roof and bowed with us morning and evening at our family alter. He called my house his home.”

The Civil War was fought differently in Kansas and Missouri than the rest of the country. In Virginia, Maryland, and Tennessee, armies of thousands would face each other in great lines of battle. In the West, battles were more often skirmishes of less than a couple of hundred men. Guerrilla tactics, surprise attacks, and ambush were the tools of the day and southerners fought by the code of the feud. The population had mixed loyalties between North or South, which caused suspicion as to who was friend or foe. Adding to the confusion southern combatants often did not wear uniforms and sometimes dressed in federal jackets. It was in the early summer of 1864 that a young 16 year old Jesse James joined Bloody Bill Anderson’s Raiders under the command of William Quantrill to ride with his older brother Frank. On the afternoon of September 27th Anderson and about 80 of his men rode out of the federal town of Centralia, leaving behind death and destruction. Much of the town was on fire and 22 non-combatant federal soldiers had been killed. When Anderson and his men rejoined Captain George Todd’s cavalry unit back at camp, word spread of what had happened. Captain Todd chastised Anderson for what had been done. What they didn’t know was that the federals were already in pursuit. Federal Major A.V.E. Johnston commander of the 39th infantry were mounted and on the trail with about 155 troops. After viewing the destruction and death in Centralia the federal commander vowed revenge, and a black flag was carried by his column indicating no quarter was to be given by his men for any wounded or captured prisoners. Major Johnston’s column was soon discovered by Anderson’s rear guard scouts led by Dave Pool who galloped back to camp warning their brethren. Instantly the camp jumped into action as Anderson’s and Todd’s raiders readied for battle. As the rebels mounted their horses they formed into squads of ten to twenty men. Two miles from Centralia at the rise of a golden yellow hayfield the federals formed a line of battle on foot. Johnston’s men were infantry soldiers carrying long-barreled, muzzle loading Enfield rifles. Johnston ordered his men to fix bayonets. Frank James would later recount, “John Koger, a funny fellow in our ranks, watched the Yankees get down from their horses, and said: ‘Why, the fools are going to fight on foot! God help em.” Anderson riding his new mount, smiled and leaned over to Archie Clement and said, “Not a damned revolver in the crowd!” But actually commander Johnston stood next to his horse with a six shooter in his hand. The troopers dismounted their horses, checked their equipment, tighten their horse’s girths, and remounted pulling their pistols. At the command they moved forward in line, slowly at first. The line move toward the enemy at a walk, then to a trot up the hill. They heard the federal commander scream “ready aim fire!” Frank James said when they heard the enemy officer’s command, “We were lying behind our horses (necks), a trick that Comanche Indians practiced.” When the federals fired their rifles nearly all the shots went over their heads. But three raiders were hit. Two of them, Richard Kinney and Frank Shepherd were Frank’s best friends riding on either side of him. Shepherd was killed out right and fell from his horse. Kinney was shot and pulled back, although he was able to cling to his horse. He would die soon afterward. Several horses went down as well. The federal line only got off only one shot. At 200 yards Anderson shouted “Charge” and with a bloodcurdling rebel yell the line leaped into a thundering gallop. Frank continued, “On up the hill, almost in the twinkling of an eye we were on the Yankee line.” The federal line quickly broke and a wild panic of fighting and fleeing took place. During the fight Jesse engaged and killed Major Johnston the union commander. All the federals who stood their ground and fought were killed, including a number who ran away. Ten of the raiders were wounded, a number had been bayoneted, and three were killed. Describing the battle Frank James said, “We never met many Federal soldiers that would fight us on equal terms. They would either outnumber us or would run away.” The battle was Jesse’s first big victory. After the war, Jesse James and his brother Frank would become some of the most notorious outlaws of the West.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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