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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING  
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Saturday November 9, 2019 at 3 PM

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NAVAL WARFARE THROUGH CIVIL WAR PAINTINGS

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At our temporary premises at Wolubilis, lecture by Maurice Jaquemyns: Naval warfare through Civil War paintings. The representation of war at sea is the second part of the lecture dedicated to the so-called historical painting during the American Civil War. Our lecturer will analyze the paintings evoking sea combat and will try to show that, on both the Federal and Confederate sides, painters are scholars of the European schools and models while innovating in their own production. The subject will be illustrated by numerous examples intended to establish the filiations and to identify the specifics of maritime propaganda paintings.

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Saturday December 14, 2019 at 3 PM

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THE PRINCES OF ORLEANS IN THE CIVIL WAR

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At our temporary premises at Wolubilis, lecture by Farid Ameur: Clad in blue: the princes of Orléans during the American Civil War (1861-1862). During the French Second Empire, under the rule of exile, the young princes of Orléans are idle. With the aid of their uncle Prince of Joinville, the 23 years old Count of Paris and his young brother the Duke of Chartres, both grandsons of King Louis-Philippe, decide to inquire on the state of American democracy. Arriving in New York in September 1861, five months after the outbreak of the American Civil War, they are welcomed by President Lincoln and Secretary of State Seward. Wishing to serve the Federal cause in the field and hoping to find glory, they dress up in the blue uniform of the Union soldier and are assigned captains on the staff of General McClellan, Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the Potomac. To the embarrassment of European chancelleries, they take part in military operations against the Confederates, despite little success. In July 1862, at the end of the Peninsula Campaign, they return home with a formidable experience. Battle hardened with techniques of modern warfare, they can now adhere to the family military tradition with a degree in liberalism.

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IMPORTANT NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform our foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of our CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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NEVER AGAINST VIRGINIA

THE CHARMING LUCY BUCK AT BEL AIR

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In the spring of 1861, he was described as the most promising officer in the United States Army. Hero of the Mexican War, superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, capturer of the radical John Brown, Col. Robert Edward Lee was highly thought of by old "Fuss and Feathers" himself General Winfield Scott. On April 18th, at the request of Abraham Lincoln, Lee was summoned to Washington and met with Francis P. Blair, where he was offered field command of the entire Union Army. Lee politely declined. Virginia had voted to secede the day before. It was at his Arlington estates that Lee confronted the greatest dilemma of his life. He had turned down Lincoln's offer to climb to the highest pinnacle of any man's military career thus remaining loyal to the State of Virginia and his family ties to the South. But the winds of war were sweeping around him and soon orders to duty would follow. Lee spent the evening alone in his wife's flower garden next to their home. A special place for the Lee family, the garden served not only as an area for Mary Lee's rose cultivation, but also as a favorite gathering place and retreat for all members of the family. It is there where Lee would make his momentous decision that would change the course of American history. At midnight Saturday the 20th of April, Lee wrote his letter of resignation from the United States Army. On the 21st the Governor of Virginia asked Lee to take command of the state militia. Lee explained that he could never draw his sword against his native state. When he was called upon to take command of Confederate forces, Lee left his beloved Arlington behind, destined never to return. For four years his brilliant, charismatic leadership would inspire the Army of Northern Virginia and the people of the South.

It had been an arduous march south from the bloody fields of Gettysburg for the Army of Northern Virginia. Torrential rains had flooded the Potomac River delaying the southern army’s retreat to the relative safety of Virginia. With US General George Meade’s Federal forces closing in, Lee’s army was finally able to cross the Potomac on July 13th. Still in pursuit, General Meade’s cavalry crossed the Potomac farther down river, East of the Blue Ridge Mountains and began to occupy a number of passes around Loudoun County. As hats, coats and uniforms began to dry out, the Army of Northern Virginia arrived at the Shenandoah River. Across the river was the town of Front Royal, and Lee ordered his engineers to quickly build another pontoon bridge. On July 22 the southern army crossed the bridge into Front Royal. A wealthy businessman and prominent citizen of Front Royal, William M. Buck sought out General Lee at the pontoons, to invite him and his staff for refreshments at his home Bel Air House. Lee welcomed the kind invitation and rode to the manor house with some members of his staff. There he was introduced to the Buck family. 19 year old Lucy Buck wrote of the encounter in her diary. “The old gentleman greeted us with such a warm, fatherly manner.” General Lee along with his staff including Majors Taylor and Talcott enjoyed fresh buttermilk while Lucy and her sister Nellie entertained with songs of the south. The brief respite of time with the Buck family had been most welcome for General Lee. But upon returning to his army he warned his staff, “We must now prepare for harder blows and harder work.”

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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