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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday October 14, 2017, at 3 PM

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PRINCE ABDUL RAHMAN OF FOUTAH-DJALOO

 IN NATCHEZ, MISSISSIPPI

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Conference by Tierno M. Sow: "Prince Abdul Rahman of Foutah-Djaloo in Natchez, Mississippi". Our speaker Tierno M. Sow descends by his mother from one of the nine founders of the kingdom of Foutah-Djaloo, a secular Muslim theocracy established in the 18th century in the heart of Guinea, close to Senegal and Gambia. A prince of this kingdom, Abdul Rahman Barry, born in 1762, was captured, enslaved and taken to the United States where he was sold in 1788 to a planter of Natchez. In 1826, a letter written in Arabic to his parents ended up in the American consulate of Morocco. It was transmitted to the Sultan who, thinking that he was a Moor, requested President John Quincy Adams and Secretary of State Henry Clay to release him. Finally freed in 1829, Abdul Rahman travelled to Liberia where he died shortly after his arrival at the age of 67, without having seen his native Foutah. Through his story, our lecturer will compare the living conditions in the kingdom of Foutah-Djaloo and Natchez, Mississippi, during the first half of the 19th century. Politics, slavery, economics and education in each of these two societies will be discussed.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued March 27, 2017)
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The return of the Tuscarora, by Donald E. Collins

Debacle in Tennessee, the Franklin and Nashville campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued September 21, 2017)
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The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Alcide Bouanchaud, Pointe Coupee Artillery, Louisiana, by Brian Costello

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Next CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end March 2018)
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Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

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It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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THE TEXAS BATTLE FLAG

SHENANDOAH MOUNTAIN PASSAGE

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The battle flag of the 1st Texas Regiment carried into the most ferocious and desperate two hours of the battle of Antietam proudly flew the colors of the State of Texas. Stonewall Jackson’s corps was desperately trying to hold General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia’s left flank from a sea of blue clad soldiers under the command of US General Joseph Hooker. Reinforcements were called in and General John Bell Hood’s Texans were brought up to hold the line. Hood’s brigades were able to hold their ground during the pitched battle but the 1st Texas Regiment decided not just to hold their ground but charged forward across the Miller’s cornfield on their own. These courageous men could not be stopped even by their own officers’ orders, and they fought across the 40 acre corn field carrying what became known as the Texas Wigfall Flag. The flag was so named because it was made from Mrs. Wigfall’s wedding dress. Nine color bearers were killed carrying the flag during some of the most savage fighting of the war. The 1st Texas suffered over 82 % casualties on that field, more than any other Regiment North or South, during the entire war. The blood soaked flag was not captured in battle but found by a federal soldier under the body of one of those brave Texas heroes. The flag was returned to the State of Texas in 1909, and hung with honor in the chamber of the Texas House of Representatives until the 1920’s. This painting was commissioned by the Texas Sons of Confederate Veterans to be placed on the State of Texas motor vehicle license plates.

General Stonewall Jackson’s Valley Campaign began at 3 AM on April 30th under stormy conditions. Weather at the end of April had gone from cold rain, sleet, and snow to rain again. Streams were flowing out of their banks and water was pouring down from the mountains. The roads were turned into quagmires and fields looked more like ponds. Undaunted, General Jackson led his army of 6,000 men up the Blue Ridge towards the seldom used pass known as Brown’s Gap. Jackson’s topographer and map maker Jedediah Hotchkiss knew the country like the back of his hand and was directing the army’s trek through the back roads and mountain trails to screen the movements of the great force. Similarly to the travails of the Romney Expedition, the trail was tough going for both man and horse. Horses floundered, wagons broke down and roads had to be reinforced with stones, fence rails, and trees to keep the cannons moving. Often General Jackson himself would dismount and help collect wood and stones. One of the soldiers cursing General Jackson for the back breaking work, was surprised to hear a voice from behind him say, "It is for your own good sir." Turning, he saw Jackson working just as hard. General Jackson’s first target on the spring campaign was the Federal force located at McDowell. He had received a dispatch from General Robert E. Lee on May 1st saying "If you can strike an effective blow against the enemy west of Staunton, it would be very advantageous." On May 3rd the tired army arrived at Mechum’s River Station on the Virginia Central Railroad. Fortunately for the weary soldiers the force was able to board the train and ride for Staunton. Disembarking west of Staunton, Jackson prepared his men for the 20 mile mountain march which would cross four ridges of Shenandoah Mountain and down into the hamlet of McDowell. Sandie Pendleton observed "This is the meanest country I ever saw, but it is still old Virginia and we must have it." At daybreak on May 8th Jackson’s army once again began their climb. At the end of the day’s journey through Shenandoah Mountains they would completely surprise and crush the Federal troops at McDowell, their first victory of the Valley Campaign.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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