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MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM PM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETING    
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Saturday September 9, 2017, at 3 PM

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CHEMICAL AND BACTERIOLOGICAL WARFARE

DURING THE CIVIL WAR

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Conference by Daniel Frankignoul: “Chemical and bacteriological warfare during the Civil War”. During the first half of the nineteenth century, the evolution of physics, chemistry, biology and medicine was such that many scientists and inventors planned to use their discoveries. In most cases these were not put into practical use but attempts were made by both sides during the conflict. The lecturer will depict the first use of chlorine as a fighting gas. Other ideas ranged from the vaporization of chloroform, the dropping of canisters from balloons, the throwing of “Chinese stink balls” and of grenades containing arsenic, chloroform, hydrochloric or sulfuric acid, the dispersion of sulfur fumes to cause suffocation of the enemy and the contamination of wells with animal carcasses during the withdrawal of troops. At the end of the conflict, the enigmatic Dr. Luke P. Blackburn, a future governor of Kentucky, was accused of trying to launch in Washington, D.C., Norfolk and New Bern an outbreak of yellow fever imported from Bermuda. As to the Northerners, they attempted to exchange Confederate prisoners who had contracted small-pox.

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PREVIOUS CHAB NEWS (Issued September 29, 2016)
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Forty days of hell, the Atlanta campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

Eastern North Carolinians in the Union Army, by Donald E. Collins

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CURRENT CHAB NEWS (Issued March 27, 2017)
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The return of the Tuscarora, by Donald E. Collins

Debacle in Tennessee, the Franklin and Nashville campaign, by Jean-Claude Janssens

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NEXT CHAB NEWS (Foreseen end September 2017)
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The last days of the Alabama, by Charles Priestley

William Yancey and the Fishmongers, by Charles Priestley

Alcide Bouanchaud, Pointe Coupee Artillery, Louisiana, by Brian Costello

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FORTHCOMING CHAB NEWS
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Charles Augustus Hobart, blockade runner and Turkish admiral, by Charles Priestley

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PAYMENT OF SUBSCRIPTIONS BY PAYPAL

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It is recommended that our American and international members pay their yearly CHAB subscription by PayPal. Please make all payments to: chab.belgium@yahoo.com

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LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

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THE TEXAS BATTLE FLAG

SECRET RENDEZVOUS

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The battle flag of the 1st Texas Regiment carried into the most ferocious and desperate two hours of the battle of Antietam proudly flew the colors of the State of Texas. Stonewall Jackson’s corps was desperately trying to hold General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia’s left flank from a sea of blue clad soldiers under the command of US General Joseph Hooker. Reinforcements were called in and General John Bell Hood’s Texans were brought up to hold the line. Hood’s brigades were able to hold their ground during the pitched battle but the 1st Texas Regiment decided not just to hold their ground but charged forward across the Miller’s cornfield on their own. These courageous men could not be stopped even by their own officers’ orders, and they fought across the 40 acre corn field carrying what became known as the Texas Wigfall Flag. The flag was so named because it was made from Mrs. Wigfall’s wedding dress. Nine color bearers were killed carrying the flag during some of the most savage fighting of the war. The 1st Texas suffered over 82 % casualties on that field, more than any other Regiment North or South, during the entire war. The blood soaked flag was not captured in battle but found by a federal soldier under the body of one of those brave Texas heroes. The flag was returned to the State of Texas in 1909, and hung with honor in the chamber of the Texas House of Representatives until the 1920’s. This painting was commissioned by the Texas Sons of Confederate Veterans to be placed on the State of Texas motor vehicle license plates.

It was one of the most fascinating and romantic love stories of the Civil War. Lt. Jesse McNeill was a member of McNeill’s Rangers, a partisan unit of Confederate cavalrymen based out of Moorefield in western Virginia. 18-year-old Jesse was deeply in love with the young and beautiful Mary Clara Bruce. Mary’s father, Robert Bruce, was the Colonel of the U.S. Second Maryland Regiment, of the Potomac Home Brigade. Col. Bruce was also a prominent banker, accountant and businessman in Cumberland. Mary was an outgoing vivacious beauty who acted and sang occasionally at the Belvedere Hall theater in Cumberland. Her relationship with a handsome young Confederate lieutenant would never be sanctioned by her parents. The problem for Jesse was that not only did his sweetheart live 50 miles away, her father was a U.S. Army Colonel and she resided in a town that was a Federal strong hold, garrisoned with 8,000 troops to protect the B&O railroad hub. Also, Federal generals considered McNeill’s Rangers “Bushwhackers” and not entitled to the rules of war regarding captured prisoners. If Jesse was caught in or around the town of Cumberland, he would most certainly be hung as a spy. To complicate matters even more, word came to Jesse that one of the Federal Major Generals residing in the Barnum House, Benjamin F. Kelley, was beginning to court Mary. Jesse needed to see Mary. Undaunted by the risk and accompanied by his friend and fellow Ranger John B. Fay, a secret rendezvous was arranged near the Revere House, a hotel located next to the B&O railroad depot on Baltimore Street. After the romantic meeting, shielded by a steam engine and train, Jesse realized something needed to be done about General Kelley. The matter was brought before the whole Company of Rangers, and it was decided that a raid would be planned to capture General Kelley who was staying at the Barnum House and General Crook at the Revere House, and clear the way for Jesse’s love affair. The great Cumberland raid took place on the snowy night of February 21st and resulted in one of the most brilliant exploits of the civil war, the capture of Major Generals Kelley and Crook. After a brief confinement in Richmond, Virginia, Kelley was released by special exchange shortly before the war ended three months later. Kelley returned to Cumberland where he would offer Mary Clara Bruce the security and comfortable life of being the wife of a wealthy general. She accepted General Kelley’s marriage proposal despite her love for Jesse and her thoughts of their secret rendezvous.

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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