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French CHAB News June 2022

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

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NEXT MEETINGS
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Saturday 8 October 2020 at 3 PM

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STATUARY AND THE CIVIL WAR

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Maurice Jaquemyns: Statuary and the Civil War. Civil War commemorative statuary responds to codes of expression that run through the entire history of art. We will discuss the artistic manifestations of this type of representation used by the belligerents in the conflict and we will focus our attention on their underlying intentions. We will end the conference with a general synthesis of our previous interventions by highlighting the roles and codes of military representation whatever the medium: paintings of land and naval battles, comics and commemorative statuary.

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Saaturday 5 November 2022 at 7 PM

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CHAB'S 50th ANNIVERSARY GRAND BANQUET

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Our association is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year (1972-2022). To mark this memorable event, the CHAB is organizing a grand banquet in a stylish restaurant. A private room will be reserved for the evening.

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Saturday 10 December 2022 at 3 PM

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TEXAS, AN INDEPENDENT AMERICAN REPUBLIC 

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At our temporary premises in Wolubilis, lecture by Jean-Claude Janssens: Texas, an independent American Republic (1836-1845). As of 1520, Texas as we know it today was part of the Spanish Empire. Between 1685 and 1690, it was French before returning to the Crown of Spain; nevertheless, it was claimed again by France until 1763. In 1821, Mexico – of which Texas was an integral part – proclaimed its independence from Spain. From that moment on, the history of this barren land would accelerate, and at the request of the government of Mexico, American immigrants settled there. In 1835, the new Texans numbered thirty thousand for only eight thousand natives. In 1836, Texas Americans broke away from Mexico. After almost ten years of precarious independence, they joined their powerful neighbor, the United States of America.

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CHAB NEWS END OF PUBLICATION NOTICE

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The CHAB committee wishes to inform its foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of the CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.
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LATEST PAINTINGS OF JOHN PAUL STRAIN
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RIDE AROUND McCLELLAN

GOLDEN SKY

 

In March 1862, US General George B. McClellan began his campaign to capture the Confederate Capitol of Richmond. McClellan landed 121,500 men and equipment by boat on the Virginia Peninsula and moved inland. However, the Federals were met with strong southern resistance, and after a series of battles their offensive stalled. When commanding Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston was wounded in battle, General Robert E. Lee took command of the Army of Northern Virginia. On June 10, 1862, General Robert E. Lee met with his cavalry commander, General J.E.B. Stuart concerning how best to defend Richmond. Lee’s plan was to go on the offensive against McClellan’s huge Army of the Potomac. But to do this General Lee needed detailed information on the enemy’s right flank, and this is where General J.E.B. Stuart and his cavalry came in. One of Stuart’s scouts and staff member Lt. John S. Mosby had reconnoitered the federal right flank and found only a thin screen of cavalry pickets guarding the position. Mosby reported the federal supply depots near the Pamunkey River, and communication lines were completely unprotected. Lee was intrigued and excited about the daring plan for an expedition into the area and gave his approval. On the morning of June 12th, General Stuart with 1500 cavalry men, guided by Lt. Mosby, headed in the direction of the Shenandoah Valley to fool any union sympathizers as to their destination. But in the early hours of the 13th the column moved east into enemy territory heading towards the Hanover Court House. One of the cavalry men described the terrain as the sun broke over the horizon. “The roads were surrounded by the fertile fields of waving golden grain.” When the column approached the courthouse a squadron of about 150 federal “Blue Birds” on picket duty were completely caught off guard. In a very few moments they mounted their horses and disappeared in a dense cloud of dust. Now discovered, the raiders pressed forward rapidly and took the road to Old Church. Near a wooded area near Haw’s Shop, General Stuart and his escort were engaged by Union pickets and cavalry. Stuart gave orders to “Form fours! And charge!” The men in gray pursued the enemy with shouts and yells. A number of the Federals were killed or captured. The chase continued till they reached a small sluggish stream called Totopotomoy Creek. Stuart’s cavalry continued on to attack a federal supply depot and camp near Old Church. Large supplies of boots, pistols, liquors, and commodities were found and liberated by the southerners. Horses were drafted into Confederate service and supplies left were burned along with federal tents. Telegraph wires were cut along the way as well. General Stuart had achieved his goals on the raid, but now the column was in the heart of the enemy’s country. The expedition had passed within sight of the white tents of General McClellan’s headquarters causing all manner of confusion and fear. At this point Stuart could not return by the route he had advanced. The alarm had been sounded all over the country, and an overpowering force of Federal infantry, cavalry, and artillery had been rapidly moving to intercept the daring raiders. Stuart was asked by one of his officers, that if they got into a tight place would they surrender? Stuart replied “No, … one other course was left … To die game.” Stuart and his men kept their fast pace as they continued their ride around McClellan’s forces, not stopping to rest. They travelled all night and at dawn arrived at the Chickahominy River, where a barn was hastily torn down to rebuild an old bridge. Now passing through friendly territory Stuart’s raid had become a tremendous success. The three-day ride had covered over 150 miles through enemy territory, cutting communication lines, confiscating supplies, weapons, equipment, horses, capturing 180 Federal soldiers, and causing panic and confusion behind Union lines. The whole expedition was highly embarrassing for General George McClellan. Northern newspapers featured the debacle as front-page news, and President Lincoln was livid. Southern papers cheered the amazing exploit. Stuart had proved to General Lee, that he was a very capable commander, and was “game” for any challenge.

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

A distant crack of a Federal sharp-shooter’s rifle was instantly heard, as the bullet whistled past Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, barely missing them. The two commanders made a dash to some nearby woods. It had been a close call, one that easily could have changed the whole course of the war. But this was the risk these brave leaders often faced leading their armies in battle. Lee and Jackson had been scouting the ground southeast of the Plank road on a small pathway leading to Catherine’s Furnace. In the early morning of April 27, the Army of the Potomac under the command of General Joseph Hooker had begun an offensive towards the Confederate left, by crossing the Rappahannock River on pontoons. On the 29th, General Stuart dispatched a telegram to Lee reporting that his men had engaged the enemy at Maddens, nine miles from Culpeper. They had captured Federal troops from the V, XI, and XII Corps of the Army of the Potomac. The dispatch also informed Lee that large columns of federal troops were headed for Germanna and Ely’s Ford on the Rapidan River. With this vital information Lee was able to determine General Hooker’s plan was to turn the Confederate left flank. General Lee ordered Stuart to rejoin the main body of the army post haste. On the 30th, a courier arrived from General Anderson at Chancellorsville, informing Lee the federal force had crossed the Rapidan and was heading his way. Anderson requested reinforcements, and Lee ordered Anderson and his four brigades to dig in. Hooker’s advance was tentative. When confronted by southern brigades, the Federals would stop, retreat and regroup before advancing again. General Lee felt there was something suspicious about the situation, as numerically, General Hooker’s army was far superior than his. In the late evening of May 1st, he met up with Jackson near the Plank road to get a better feel of things. After retreating from the sniper into the woods, Lee and Jackson dismounted and began discussing how best to deal with the invading federal force. They were soon joined by General Stuart in this night conference. Lee had already left part of his army at Fredericksburg to counter any federal moves there. His new plan was to divide his army again sending General Jackson’s Corps on a flanking maneuver at 4am and attack the unsuspecting Federal XI Corps in their camps. The plan the commanders came up with would lead to one of the greatest victories for the Confederacy, and one of the costliest. General Jackson would be mortally wounded.

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© All copyrights reserved by John Paul Strain Historical Art

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For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

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