CHAB a.s.b.l.
 

Home
 
About Us
 
Officers
 
Activities
 
Programme
 
Articles
 
Publications
 
Library
 
International
 
Contributors
 
Information
 

This site requires


 

 

 

 
 

MUSICAL BACKGROUND

"Seneca Square Dance" by Ry Cooder, from the film "The Long Riders"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

.

HOME

CONFEDERATE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION OF BELGIUM

Due to the renovation works at the Communal Museum, the CHAB Club House has moved into temporary premises at Wolubilis, Woluwe-Saint-Lambert. Our monthly meetings will thus be held there until further notice. New Address: 1 place du Temps Libre - Local A300 - 3rd floor (right when leaving the elevator). The building is located along the Cours Paul-Henri Spaak, just opposite the Woluwe Shopping Center. The entrance is on the ground floor, left of the bookstore/restaurant Cook & Book. See access map

6

.
NEXT MEETING  
.

Saturday December 14, 2019 at 3 PM

..

THE PRINCES OF ORLEANS IN THE CIVIL WAR

..

.

At our temporary premises at Wolubilis, lecture by Farid Ameur: Clad in blue: the princes of Orléans during the American Civil War (1861-1862). During the French Second Empire, under the rule of exile, the young princes of Orléans are idle. With the aid of their uncle Prince of Joinville, the 23 years old Count of Paris and his young brother the Duke of Chartres, both grandsons of King Louis-Philippe, decide to inquire on the state of American democracy. Arriving in New York in September 1861, five months after the outbreak of the American Civil War, they are welcomed by President Lincoln and Secretary of State Seward. Wishing to serve the Federal cause in the field and hoping to find glory, they dress up in the blue uniform of the Union soldier and are assigned captains on the staff of General McClellan, Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the Potomac. To the embarrassment of European chancelleries, they take part in military operations against the Confederates, despite little success. In July 1862, at the end of the Peninsula Campaign, they return home with a formidable experience. Battle hardened with techniques of modern warfare, they can now adhere to the family military tradition with a degree in liberalism.

5

.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

.

The CHAB committee wishes to inform our foreign and American friends that due to severe budget constraints, the English version of our CHAB News is no longer published. However, the French version of our quarterly remains available to the contributing members of our association. Thank you for your understanding.

..


.

LATEST PAINTINGS FROM JOHN PAUL STRAIN

.

4

THE CHARMING LUCY BUCK AT BEL AIR

HOME ON BRADDOCK STREET

6

It had been an arduous march south from the bloody fields of Gettysburg for the Army of Northern Virginia. Torrential rains had flooded the Potomac River delaying the southern army’s retreat to the relative safety of Virginia. With US General George Meade’s Federal forces closing in, Lee’s army was finally able to cross the Potomac on July 13th. Still in pursuit, General Meade’s cavalry crossed the Potomac farther down river, East of the Blue Ridge Mountains and began to occupy a number of passes around Loudoun County. As hats, coats and uniforms began to dry out, the Army of Northern Virginia arrived at the Shenandoah River. Across the river was the town of Front Royal, and Lee ordered his engineers to quickly build another pontoon bridge. On July 22 the southern army crossed the bridge into Front Royal. A wealthy businessman and prominent citizen of Front Royal, William M. Buck sought out General Lee at the pontoons, to invite him and his staff for refreshments at his home Bel Air House. Lee welcomed the kind invitation and rode to the manor house with some members of his staff. There he was introduced to the Buck family. 19 year old Lucy Buck wrote of the encounter in her diary. “The old gentleman greeted us with such a warm, fatherly manner.” General Lee along with his staff including Majors Taylor and Talcott enjoyed fresh buttermilk while Lucy and her sister Nellie entertained with songs of the south. The brief respite of time with the Buck family had been most welcome for General Lee. But upon returning to his army he warned his staff, “We must now prepare for harder blows and harder work.”

General Stonewall Jackson was in high spirits during the snowy days of January 1862. He and his army had returned from successful expeditions to Bath and Romney. He learned that his men were strong and faithful through difficult and challenging days. The Federals in Northern Virginia had been shown that his army was not to be taken lightly. Also to Stonewall’s delight, his wife Anna was in Winchester staying at the home of Reverend James R. Graham located on Braddock Street. For the first time General Jackson and Anna could be together for an extended period of time. The General’s headquarters and office were just up the street at the home of Lieutenant Colonel Lewis T. Moore, commander of the 31st Virginia Militia. The Graham family home was the perfect place for the Jacksons to stay in Winchester. Fanny and James Graham were wonderful hosts and the General loved their three children, Anne, Alfred and William. The Jacksons were given the upstairs northeast corner of the house for their privacy. The family atmosphere at the Graham home was just the respite that the General needed from the stress and responsibilities of the military. The General would never conduct or discuss any military matters or business at the Graham home. If a courier or dispatch arrived, Jackson would direct the man to his office up the street. General Jackson was a man of meticulous habits. He would arise at the same early hour every day and immediately go to his headquarters to attend to the mail and issue orders for the day. A few minutes before 8:00am he would return to the Graham’s home and escort his wife downstairs to breakfast. Speaking of General Jackson, Reverend Graham would tell his parishioners that “he is really a member of my family. He ate every day at my table, slept every night under my roof and bowed with us morning and evening at our family alter. He called my house his home.”

.

For information or online orders:

www.johnpaulstrain.com

.